How I sell needlework online

I have had a few people ask me how to do this, so I so I am sharing how I do it.

First I researched what I was selling; I Googled, I looked on other selling sites (including EBay and Amazon). I made notes of prices if exact match or close. I made notes of descriptions. In short I did my research.

Then I went to Facebook, and checked needlepoint selling sites; when I first started there were only 2-3, now there are 8-10 and that doesn’t include Ebay and Amazon. I noted how many members they had, how often posts were listed, and if there seemed to be some active traffic and selling. I read their rules (but if you miss something the administrators will usually let you know.) Let me add a note here: the rules have changed over the years and some sites have more rules than others.

I also noted who was selling on these sites and if there were people whose names I recognized I watched their posts to get an idea of how they were listing their items, if they were selling, and noted their pricing.

You need to spend some time checking out the sites and decide which site(s) are best for you.

I keep two files: A spreadsheet with columns and a formula: my columns are (underline column heading)

Control Number ### (PayPal will give you an invoice number and a transaction number: I use the last three digits of the invoice number and the last 4-5 numbers/letters or the transaction number- Example 001…1234A),

Name of the Items (I use designer or author name if known too, Example: MShirley Thimble Angle or Author-Book title),

Selling Price (this may change if you mark down),

Fees (PayPal and Ebay have them),

Mailing Cost

Net this is my formula column (=sum(sell-fee-mail)

Buyer Last name

Tracking Number: I do not send anything I cannot track.

The other file I keep is a word document that has my pre-listing info. I came up with a format for me and I pretty much stick with it (unless administrators want sometime more or less and then I adjust this format OR pull the item and find another site to use.   Before I list an item I have the following information written down in a master word file.

 

Description of Item:    Needlepoint canvas- be very descriptive

Example: MShirley Thimble Angel canvas

Asking Price and date:

Example: $00.00-month-day-year

(I do this so if I reduce I can show new date too)

Example: reduced$00.00 date ($00.00 date) this is original price

Note: I do not reduce second time. I pull the item if it does not sell and may at a later date re –list at original price OR just donate or sell to used book store.

Designer/Author: if known

Original cost: if known

Size of canvas/book: measurements

Size of Design area: ONLY area to be stitched (needlepoint canvas only)

Condition: (new-used-partially stitched- old- fair- poor) I usually add whether it is smoke free home and whether a pet lives with you. I have a note here too…I have sold things for a third party and unless the third party lets me know the smoke and pet status, I leave it out.

Postage & handling: type and who pays—

Note: I use either first class or book rate;  I round the postage to nearest .50  Note about book rate…if you purchase postage through PayPal there is a tracking # for book rate; if you go to post office there is no tracking number available. I also add the cost of the envelope.

US shipping only: some people don’t mind shipping out of the US but even Canada has additional paper work and cost

Comment “Me Please”

 

This is what a book listing might look like: (would also have pictures)

Item: Basics and Beyond

Selling Price $10/ 9-1-20 (only price shows on listing )

Author: Janice Love

Original cost: $15

Publishing date – 1990

Number of Pages: 50 pages

Book dimensions -8.5 inches x 12 inches x 1/4 inch

Soft cover. A beginner’s guide to Hardanger. 12 stitches are featured and diagrams and photos are excellent. 8 designs are available. An excellent reference book.

Condition: Excellent There is a small tear on a page (see picture) Smoke free, pet free home. Postage will be Media Mail $5.50 (my standard price)

Payment method: PayPal

USA shipping only

Comment “me please” below if you would like to purchase.

 

Hope this helps and good luck selling…

Thank You for stopping by again.

I hope you have time to stitch today and every day…

ttfn…sue

Catching up

Been a long time since I blogged and I have no excuses. All I can say is until this awful Covid shut down I was having the time of my life trying new things. I think I have mentioned I was learning to crochet again and learned to knit too. I will probably never be an expert at either of these crafts but I do enjoy them and wish I had more time to do everything I would like to accomplish.

Lily of Valley Necklace

I have discovered I really like beading. I’m not much into jewelry but have

Spinning Star

made a few necklaces and will continue to make an occasional piece BUT the 3D pieces are so interesting to me. I love the boxes that are available to make and want to be able to design my own. I like the stars, but you can only have so many stars. Although the spinning stars designed by Franklin Martin Jr (https://www.facebook.com/groups/2700808173532468)  are very  cool. I took his Zoom class and  I made one (wrong of course); mine has eight points, should have ten points. But I made it work and I love to spin it.

 

shapes

Franklin Martin Jr  is also part of the group CGB: Contemporary Geometric Beading (https://beadmobile.wordpress.com/). I have long been fascinated by this group but I’m not sure I understand it all …yet it is fascinating stuff. I bought their first two books years ago and love to look at them but am not an experienced enough beader to understand this concept yet.

 

Last week I spent a week taking or participating in International Bead Week. This is probably one of the few good things to come out of Covid shut down. The Beadworkers Guild of UK (http://www.beadworkersguild.org.uk/) holds an International Bead Week the first of August and this year they were offering it online since the world is in quarantine. What a lovely break for the beading world…several times we met online just to chat about beading; there were beading classes online and many free patterns to stitch. It was truly an international event and I met people from all over the world who love to bead.

 

I also heard about The Johnson Solid projects. Diane Fitzgerald has been heading a project where 92 beaders are making a Johnson solid in bead: See Facebook: Johnson Solid Project for more information (https://www.facebook.com/groups/2265910877041556/)  These fascinate me and now the beadworkers Guild are also doing their own project for display at their International beadwork  meeting hopefully next year.

I participated in the Black and White Together project (https://www.nationalbeadingweek.co.uk/

Black & White Together

Black-and-White-Together-Project.php). I stitched 8 warped squares that have been sent to South Carolina where they will be stitched into a yet unknown artwork.

 

 

Heart For Hospice

And of course there is my first love needlepoint. I still enjoy needlepoint but you can only have so many pillows and stand ups. And truthfully I’m not convinced my sons or their wives appreciate the love, work and $$ involved in needlepoint.

Right now I am working on the thimble figures from Melissa Shirley’s nativity. I’ve had

MS Nativity

these pieces forever and just never got around to stitching them. But during shut down I decided it was a good project. I also decided that I was going to stitch them all in silk with a little Kreinik for glitz and they are all stitched in Basketweave. No pressure to pick threads or stitches, just a relaxing time. I can finish one every two days if I keep my beading to a minimum…I have been trying to get one done every week or so. (that beading really has me hooked)

And since my beading library is growing I have been thinking that I need to reduce my needlepoint, quilting, color and design libraries and to that end have been separating the books into keep and sell shelves. I will keep the books that I love to look through and those that pertain to subjects I am still interested in stitching …i.e. goldwork, some ribbonwork stumpwork and a few others. I do not need the extensive library I acquired when I was studying to for teacher certification and when I was designing, so in the next few weeks I am going to begin to offer some of my library for sale.

Each book is like an old friend; see my blog about my book friends: ( https://sudukc.wordpress.com/2009/04/01/books-are-friends/ )  So this has turned out to be a more difficult project than I anticipated as I have been going through each book and it has brought back many memories. My mother purchased many of the books when I first started, I bought many at my first national needlepoint convention, and I met a very dear bookseller that invited me to his home to search for more books. I love the color pictures, you can see the changes in our color choices and pattern tastes over the years.  This is becoming a real trip down memory lane and more difficult than I imagined it would be.

I was looking in a Maggie Lane book and I love her reference to stitches to use: “…two basic flat stitches , and three bump, or lump stitches.” We’ve come a long way since the 70’s. Out charts are computerized now and I must say some old photography is pretty comical now. But the one constant is the love of stitching, color and design. Tastes change but basic color and design rules are the same.

I have come to the conclusion this is going to be a long, difficult task for me; so I have decided to do it in stages maybe 10-15 books at a time. I will write the description, take the pictures and place them online and monitor them. But I have also decided should any of  my blog readers be interested, if you send me and email at sudu@kc.rr.com I will send you my lists as they became available. I will send the list to blog participants a week ahead of posting online and I will update the lists as I go. It will be strictly a first come, first serve bases.

And so that’s what I have been up to for the last year…beading, needlepointing with an occasional try at crochet or knitting.  I still help out with a few teachers and shops that need graphs. I plan on continuing to writing my blog. I want to document some more finishing for anyone interested.

And I am now on path to simplify my footprint.

I just found this in my notes; I have no idea how old it is or where it came from but it is such good advice in this strange time.

Creative Dry Spell remedies:

  1. Spend some time with your stash
  2. Finish a UFO or several
  3. Practice a stitch/technique you haven’t mastered or would like to learn
  4. Look ahead to projects you must finish
  5. Just keep active.

Thank You for stopping by again.

I hope you have time to stitch today and every day…no matter what media you chose.

ttfn…sue

Hearts

I haven’t been ignoring my blog but I have been busy designing needlepoint hearts and making beaded butterflies. But, I have been remiss in writing about my guild’s philanthropic project, Hearts For Hospice.

Guild members (really anyone who wants to help on this project, you do not have to be a guild member) stitch hearts; Sue and her 12 year old Grandson, Jon, make the twists (DMC #3 perle) to finish the hearts, Georgia and Sara (and sometimes we have a finishing day) finish these hearts at no cost and the hearts are donated to three (3) local Hospice Houses, one is a children’s home.

Maybe you saw the article in ANG NeedlePointers, Jan/Feb 2019 and May 2017; Needlepoint Now, January/February 2019, and on Facebook.

It all began when our friend Georgia went over to “The Home” at her retirement community to volunteer. They asked her if she had received her flu shot and of course she had not (doesn’t like them or maybe they don’t like her…can’t remember), so she could not volunteer. A staff member saw hearts Georgia was stitching and inquired about them and asked if she could make more.  Knowing she could stitch a heart, she returned home and started making hearts and that’s how it began…one heart at a time.

Within the month she had convinced several of her friends to join her and soon it became a project and another friend, Sue Hart organized us into a philanthropic group and offered the project to our guild as an ongoing philanthropic project.

Side note: did you know that all non-for-profit organizations need a philanthropic program to qualify as a 501(3)(c)? I didn’t but it makes sense if you are a non-for-profit organization that you would do something. I know our national bylaws state that our purpose is to teach, promote and preserve the art of needlepoint but I did not know you need to have an ongoing philanthropic project.

We have encouraged members to just try a stitch and variations. These hearts make great doodle canvases. Then if you take a picture of it you will have a permanent copy and a family will receive a lovely remembrance. We have also encouraged needlepointers to take the painted canvas they thought they couldn’t live without, but have now become less likely to finish and make a heart(s) out of the painted canvas. There are two hearts from a painted canvas in this picture.

Barbara Richardson; a friend of GKCNG members and past president of ANG adapted her heart design for us to use. We use it to teach groups of needlepointers how to start and some first time needlepointers. We even have a class that shows you how to finish these hearts.

 

Several months ago Colour Complements: https://colourcomplements.com/ embroidery threads sent me samples to hand out to guild members I had several left over and so I stitched hearts with  them and sent pictures to Colour Complements. The owner contacted me and I have designed a couple hearts for her use (soon to appear on her website, I think).

 

This summer, one of the bead groups I belong to posted a beaded butterfly and I stitched those for some hearts. I asked permission of the designer, Patricia Parker to stitch them for other hearts and she gladly gave her permission. So guild members that request butterflies for their hearts will get one and I have made several for the two finishers to use at their discretion.

We (I use this term loosely, because I am but a small part of this endeavor) have been doing this for the last four years and have completed over 1400 hearts. We have received hearts from 26 states and 2 countries. There are at least three other guilds that we know about who have started their own program.

If you or your guild would like the information, contact Sue Hart at Heartsforhospicegkcng@gmail.com

If you have any #5 or #3 perle cotton or #12-16 Kreinik Braid (Ribbons work too), or any thread suitable for cording laying around, it needs to be skeins not cut. And you don’t know what to do with it , Hearts For Hospice would be happy to use it. Just contact me or Sue Hart.

I have designed another heart in two colorways for our Hearts For Hospice program and I will PDF you the instructions for free These hearts used Colour Complements Overdye, DMC #5 perle cotton, and Kreinik #12 braid but any of your stash will work. All I ask is that you please stitch one for our Hearts For Hospice program and return to them. All the information to return to Hearts For Hospice are in the instructions. Thank you.

Thank you for stopping by, I hope you have time to stitch today.

ttfn…sue

Happy Birthday Friend and Thank you Friend

I can share this with you today; the gift has been delivered and you will see it  was a surprise and well liked. I’m sure everyone has a friend that is difficult to find a gift to give them, but this is not only about my gift receiving friend but also about my new beading mentor and friend.

I have been very fortunate in my life to have met a handful (maybe a dozen) of people who I consider mentors or inspirations to me. To be a mentor or inspiration to me just means that I want to listen to them lecture, teach, or just watch them create…and I always hope some of their creativeness falls off onto me AND I always learn something from them and I treaure their friendships. This is true of every teacher and mentor I have met and interacted with…all except one.

Cath Thomas is a bead designer and she lives in Switzerland. We have never met in person, but I not only consider her a mentor but also a friend. Let me tell you how we met…

Back in March I happen to be online when Cath posted a picture of her Octavio.

Cath Thomas Octavio

Cath Thomas Octavio

Immediately my friend sent her a message: “Is there a pattern for the octopus? I would like the instructions.”

Cath: “No I’m sorry, very difficult and just haven’t had time to write them. There is an article on my blog, https://samohtac.blogspot.com/2018/05/meet-octavio-or-how-to-take-design.html

My friend:  “Can I purchase the octopus?”

Well I knew the answer to this and so I immediately sent a private message to Cath, explaining who I was and how I knew my friend and that I would love to tackle this project to give to her for her birthday. Cath responded and said to give her a couple days and she would send me some pictures and notes. She also suggested I purchase her design “Tulip Tassel” from her web shop https://caththomasdesigns.indiemade.com/.

Over to the web shop I went and immediately knew this was meant to be. I was working on a beaded rope that was just getting longer and longer with no intended use. But when I saw the tulip I knew that this was going to be my focal point for the rope. I immediately purchased “Tulip Tassel” downloaded and printed a copy.

I read the instructions and knew I had just crossed over from a novice beaded into deep water; I felt like the kid who barely knows how to swim and finds herself in deep water. I knew this was going to be my first really hard challenge, but I gathered up beads and tried making a tulip. Took it apart and started over again…several times. Finally, for some reason I tried using a dowel I had in my tool box and voila it worked. I made my first tulip. I knew I needed to make another and since things usually work best in threes, three tulips was my goal. Amazingly I had the three tulips completed and the necklace completed in time for Easter, April 21,2019.

In the meantime, Cath had sent me notes and pictures. I had compiled all in a file, printed them, read them AND knew I was in way over my head.

Yet, I persevered. I decide rather than order beads online, sight unseen I would buy locally. This would prove to be my first good choice…if I ran out of beads I could just pop over to the bead shop and resupply. Andrea, my bead shop owner (https://beadboutiquekc.com/) helped me pick out beads and I was on my way.

On my way is a relative term, since I had no idea what I was undertaking. I was lucky, my friend had no idea what I was up to and was living in Florida. I was bound and determined to try to make this for her and so…about Mother’s Day, May 12th I took the plunge. Working the tulips had been a big help but they were in different colors and easier to keep track of the correct order…all these beads were pink. After a couple false starts I finally got the hang of it and was comfortable stitching the head. I even got the eyes in the correct places and she didn’t look cross-eyed .

Wrong size

Then came the legs. Cath had said each leg had taken her about 8 hours, that meant one or two days, maybe three for me. This also took several days because I can’t look at pictures correctly. The legs are 6 beads stitched in a Herringbone round for most of the leg; one end tapers off to a point and the other will be enlarged to connect to the head and beak.   I didn’t see or read this so my first leg was too large, and never curled like it would when stitched correctly.   My second leg was beaded incorrectly and as I was about to write Cath and tell her I gave up; a light went on. I was on my leg making journey. Each leg did take me several hours and I knew there would be more to come…I had decided not to add the suckers until after I had joined the legs to the body thinking I wouldn’t be catching the thread on them.

 

I had a deadline July 25th and so I stitched on. I would look at the head and had decided the legs would be joined in two groups of four. I decided I needed to stitch the beak in its ring so I could get a better visual in my mind of how the attachments would work. My beak is not the way it should have been beaded but it was beaded.

By July 4th I was beginning to feel the deadline fast approaching and I was nowhere near ready to assemble. I put everything else aside (housework included, but that was the easy part) and morning until night worked on the octopus. All this time I am sending updates and emails to Cath. Her patience is amazing and her advice invaluable!

As I was finishing the legs I was formulating a plan for assembly and I received an email from Cath saying the beak was not connected to the head. My first reaction was “WHAT!” Not connected, whoever heard of a mouth not connected to the head! After much though and looking at my parts I knew I had to make a decision. I decided I had in my mind seen the

beak connected to the head and the legs connected to both, so I went with it. I stitched the first leg on and it seemed to act okay (flow freely), so I continued. I did realize that not attaching the suckers before assembly was a mistake so I stopped attaching legs and attach suckers to with a 1/2 inch of the ends. I remembered reading in Cath’s notes that she attached more suckers after she assembled all the legs.

I finished my Octavio late July 23rd, two days before I was going to give her away to my friend. I bought a box, sent pictures to Cath and received the nicest complement ever. It brought tears to my eyes and still does!

Takes breath away! I swear, when I saw the first picture, I was moved and really sighed of happiness! You can be really very proud! It is just perfect!

I am very much looking forward to seeing your photos, and to learn what your friend thinks about it.

A huge bravo! I’m truly proud of you, of me, of us!

I will treasure my friendship that I have built with Cath through emails forever. Cath is a remarkable woman and bead artist. She designs constantly, shares her gifts with others and moderates three beading groups on Facebook:

Cellini Peyote Freaks (https://www.facebook.com/groups/2158100991128070/?ref=group_header)

From Petal to Pod: (https://www.facebook.com/groups/PetalToPod/?ref=group_header)      International Bead Week            https://www.facebook.com/groups/internationalbeadingweek/?ref=group_header

She has a blog (https://samohtac.blogspot.com/)

And a store (https://caththomasdesigns.indiemade.com/)

Thank you Cath; I forever in your debt.

Please keep Cath in your prayers, she is having some health issues and prayers are always helpful. Thank you!

And before anyone askes, I cannot share more than I have here about Octavio. She is not my design and without Cath’s permission I have shared all I can.

And my friend, well I think she was as surprised as I have ever seen her and I know Octavio will have a great new home.  Happy Birthday,Nancy!

And that’s why we create. For the friendships we have, the friendships we make; so we can share our time, our talents and our gifts. Thank You for stopping by.  I hope you have time to stitch today and every day.

ttfn…sue

The Tale of Three Sunflower

These three little sunflower canvases have been lying on my desk for a couple years and I guess I never blogged about the original design either.

About 2 years ago my guild asked me to stitch a free Laura Perin design. I thought it was a Rainbow Gallery freebie but when I went to look for it to give credit I could not find on either Rainbow Gallery webpage (https://www.rainbowgallery.com/) nor Laura Perin (http://www.laurajperindesigns.net/index.html) webpage.  And I’m sorry but I don’t even remember the title of the design.

The guild also wanted me to offer alternative ideas in beading for the center of the sunflower using beads; one guild member called it “messy beading.” Since I didn’t know what “messy beading” was I stitch the design as diagramed and then stitched three other center designs in the beading techniques I was familiar with. I liked all three methods of beading techniques; each technique creates its own look and I can see using in on different canvases for a special effect.

I use Miyuki beads whenever possible, Toho are also excellent beads too. I use mostly Miyuki because that is what I started with and although the beads may be intermixed, there is a very slight size difference. There are many seed beads on the market and they are not all equal; I would stick with Japanese seed bead Manufactures, Mill Hill or a source I knew I could trust. Beading is a whole blog(s) unto itself so I will just say if you are starting beading, buy one manufacturer and stick with them. I will also add an addendum to this if you buy a kit, don’t throw the beads away, use them. We will assume that whoever kits the project uses the best beads available for the project; if you find this to be untrue then substitute your favorite beads for the project.

The first sunflower used round 11/0 seed beads and made loops of beads. This is the technique I would call “messy beading” you string several beads on beading thread and make loops. I like this technique, but it will catch easily and so be careful where you use it. You could secure each loop so that if one loop breaks they all won’t come unraveled.

 

The next sunflower technique is similar to “French knots on a Stick” but they stand straight up; it could be considered another messy beading technique. It is another technique that will catch easily and so you might want to secure each spike so all will not unravel. Although you can’t see in this picture, nor can you see looking straight on the sunflower I stitched this using two different beads (see diagrams). On the four corners I used a small bugle bead topped with a seed bead. The rest of the beading was stitched using all seed beads. I didn’t think of this until just now but using different lengths of bugle beads would make an interesting effect.

Note: I did not secure either of the above but I am not using where they might be snagged.

And the last sunflower was stitched in basketweave using cylinder beads. It is just basketweave adding a bead to each stitch. What makes this technique special are the beads; they are cylinder seed beads; Miyuki names theirs Delica beads, Toho’s are Aiko, and Mill Hill are Magnifica. I guess you could use regular seed beads but I’m not sure the technique would stand out like it does with the cylinder beads.

I found this Basketweave technique from Associated Talents in their stitch guide section (http://www.atneedlepoint.com/CanvasLookup.asp?Category=Guides). I wrote and asked if I might use this and the owner graciously gave me permission. Since there was not a diagram of this technique I created one. Basketweave done with Delica beads (cylinder beads) is sooooo cool; the light refraction really looks woven.

 

 

 

 

 

Okay so that’s why and how I stitched the three little sunflowers….BUT since then these three beaded canvases have been on there little wooden stitching frames were just lying on my desk area gathering dust. The large one is put away waiting for the black box I haven’t found yet; and if all else fails I have a black frame in my stash that will work.  One day I did find a black shadow box frame that I thought would be great for them but I didn’t have a mat cut just bought the frame.

And then this January Kimberly Smith posted this fabulous finishing technique for pictures using beads and I knew that my sunflowers had just been waiting for this method. I am so excited about a new way of finishing I learned from Kimberly Smith; you can find the complete instructions here: http://akimberlydesign.blogspot.com/2019/01/sharing-techniques.html

I followed her instructions and the only things I would suggest are:

 

Start away from a corner; it seemed to make the corner beads lie smoother when you turn the canvas.

 

 

Watch for loops of unruly thread when beading…fix immediately! You don’t want unruly threads coming loose and have a hanging bead later.

 

 

I wanted no grin through or as little as possible…I didn’t think about this until I had already finished one canvas so I was very careful about marking that canvas. But with my trusty Copic black marker I darkened the canvas to minimize the white grin through. I also bought a piece of black core foam board since I didn’t want any white to be seen.

 

 

I thought the hardest part was getting the three little sunflowers in the frame evenly…But unless you have more than one canvas in a frame this should be no problem.

 

There are two questions I forgot to ask: (If you are reading this please comment or I’ll add an addendum later when I find answers.)

  1. Is there a limit to the size canvas you can use this method?
  2. My canvas was even count and so the corners came out even. How do you compensate for odd count canvas?

NOW I have another finished needlepoint…Yeah! One down many to go….

Hope you all had a Bang up 4th of July.

Thank You for stopping by.  I hope you have time to stitch today and every day.

ttfn…sue

Sorting out and other stuff

My Computer is back from the computer hospital…Over 1000 viruses but none that spread, they were all mine, tracking my every move. My doc said if it was any consolation, his mother had over 2000 and some of hers were spreadable. Well now Facebook, Amazon and Google are going to have to start over on what they send me and I’ve noticed I see more of my friends posts than I was before my computer got treated. My computer doc also said probably should not wait 8 years to do this again, at least every two years. Maybe I can find a grandchild interested in this field of work…there is always a call for computer engineers’ and seems like there will be in my lifetime. Anyway my computer is home and I’m back in business.

This last two weeks I have spent trying to organizing my stash (translation: moving one pile of stash from one place to another.) I thought I was pretty organized but am finding that not so much. I have found needlepoint stuff with other stuff and vice versa. Not really that bad, just like cross stitch and needlepoint, but occasionally have found needlepoint with knitting… I think that is a Freudian hint…knitting will NEVER replace my needlepoint. I have a lot more sorting and getting rid of to do…I really am trying to downsize.

All this organizing got me to thinking and I’m only throwing this out there not as an excuse for not blog often but as a matter of fact…There are only so many hours in a day. I’ve said all along, I need to have cloneSSSSS, yes multiple me’s (no comments friends). I like to needlepoint, bead, and crochet; sewing, finishing my needlepoint, felting, making Temari balls and attempting knitting. Now if you’re counting that’s eight things I like to do; if I give a couple hours to each (you all know you cannot get much done in 1 hour. And I’d like to sleep six or seven hours, so if I give two hours to each project and sleep six hours I have used up the day. And we all know two hours turns into one day or more for each project…so you get the picture…I need more me-s.

But this last week I did come across a few cross stitch charts lingering in my needlepoint stash; I had these visions of converting them to needlepoint. I have finally decided this probably is not going to happen with all the other projects I have in mind and so I am going to list them online for sale in a couple weeks. If anyone would like a preview, drop me a comment and I’ll send you a goodies list with pictures. You can have first dibs.

 

I have so many projects in various stages of completion that I meet myself coming and going.

Felting: no project in the works but supplies and ideas abound

 

Beading: Take you pick I have projects in various stages of completion

 

Crochet: one of a couple projects

 

 

 

 

Knitting: still at the dishrag stage….but have yarn stored for other projects

 

Temari Balls: Always have one of these going for left over threads. I make lots of sampler balls…left over threads; not enough for another project but too much to just throw away. What can I say I’m Scotch.  The surprising thing is when I offer to give one to someone; they pick the sampler balls over one with a design more often; so I have very few sampler balls in my collection. The picture shows two on right in progress and two on left are only two sampler balls I have completed right now.

Sewing: need to repair a few things too.

 

 

And my Needlepoint…have two projects in the works right now. I need to concentrate on getting some of them completed so I can move on to others I can’t wait to start. There are so many things I want to stitch and every time I go to the needlepoint shops to stitch I see more. This is just half the closet and doesn’t show the ones stored flat. I am by no means going to die with the most but I won’t die with the least either. I have to keep enough on hand since my family (all male) say when I die, they are just going to find a refrigerator box and line it inside and out with my projects before they put me in.

…And then there is the finishing on and off the blocking boards. I need to lock myself in the sewing room and not come out for a month.

And add to all this, I do like to blog, I think it is so important that we share our knowledge. So if any of the above interests you just let me know and I will blog more about that craft. And if you want to see my list of cross stitch leaflets about 25) before I put them online next week, drop me a note; I’ll send you a PDF file… don’t forget your email address or you can message me through Facebook too. .

Until my next post…Thank You for stopping by.  I hope you have time to stitch today and every day.

ttfn…sue

I’m going to try this yet again

My Grandmother and Great Aunt watched the soap opera “As The World Turns” faithfully; I do not have to watch a soap opera, my World is a soap opera or at the least a whirlwind. Now is could be that my world is turning at the same speed and I am getting slower and older but  I have two new knees and I want to get my money’s worth out of them before their warranty is up.

So no apology for not writing for a year, just know I have been moving and learning and having a whole lot of fun along the way! I will spend some time re-reading my blog and try not to bore you with re-hashing things and I’ll take lots of pictures. So if you see something in one of the pictures you’d like to know more about just ask.

In 2012 we combined households with oldest son and his family. It was a good experience and I would not change a minute of it but the time had come for us all to move on our separate ways. The two grandchildren at home have grown and are more independent every day, we all have different interests and different schedules. So we are empty nesters again (November 2018) and thinking seriously what and how we want to spend the next years.

I have spent the last few months putting house back in my order. I have been sorting thru things with the idea of downsizing, I have looked at all my holiday decorations with the idea of keep or let go. Of course no decisions have been made yet, we need to think about where we want to move (I will never want to do this again), so I want to take it slow but move forward too. I will ask the kids if there are things they would like to have but that does not seem likely as the next generations are minimalists. So I see a great multi generation sale in my future.

I have been thinking about my art/craft belongings and have decided to start going thru my needlework stuff and downsize them too, although I see this as a minimal downsize. If it comes to a tea set or my needlepoint books….well, I hope someone in the family wants the tea set it is nice and has some history. I do have some books I am will to part with, not because I don’t love them but I may have two of them and in some cases I have moved on from that technique or I will never get around to trying.

Anyway, I am going to take my computer into the computer doctor to get it a full check-up and then I will proceed like I never left and hopefully I can keep my blog  up to date.

But before I leave I want to tell you about an exhibit you should put on your calendar, especially if you live close to Kansas City. The Liberty Memorial WWI Museum (https://www.theworldwar.org/) has a special exhibit going on until Sept 2nd, 2019; Color of Memory, Fabric Art of WWI. I was privileged to go to a class last night that allowed us to see this exhibit and also to make a postcard (2019 version) of those made in WWI. Since I have one of these postcards (https://sudukc.wordpress.com/2009/08/10/my-birthday-present/), it was a treat for me and now I have two postcards to display from Memorial Day until Labor Day when I exhibit my R-W&B collection. So if you are in my next of the country, don’t miss this exhibit; and enjoy the rest of the museum too, it is our history.

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for being patient with me. See you soon.

Thank you for stopping by, I hope you have time to stitch today.

ttfn…sue

Summer Fun and Still Recovering from Guild Sale

My local guild had a stash sale last month and I am still recovering from it, I offered to chair the sale. The guild had another sale two years ago and I was part of that one too, so I knew what to expect…sort of. Now I am sorting, taking pictures and writing descriptions of about 50 + items to list for sale on the internet.

Preparing to sell online is a big deal. MUST take a picture of the entire canvas, close-ups also and if stitching has been done, a picture of that too. Pictures needed also of a stitch guide, if available and an optional one of the materials list. The materials list is a must if threads are included and then you get to lay all the threads out, check against materials list and make notes of missing or substitutions, and of course a picture of the threads.

It takes about 30 minutes per item to get all this done if there are threads involved. I think about one third of the pieces I am doing have stitch guides and threads….Some I already know from the previous owners are not complete and so I am going to list without threads and some lucky recipients will get a surprise when I include the threads I have for their purchased piece (there are about 5 of these).

I have also started practicing in the mirror 3 times a day, not to raise my hand above my head and to say the word “No” without following it up with “problem” when I go to guild meetings this fall.

It is summer and I run around a lot, so if I miss a week or so I am sorry but I will try to do better than I did last year and not show up for months on end…But we all know how I over extend myself.  But I love what I am doing and summer is such a fun time to get out and about. And I have great friends who keep me moving and learning new things , as well as enhancing my stash and “2-it” projects.  I am stitching at least twice a week with friends and going to beading once a week, not to mention the “2-do” on my desk and the “want 2-do” in my stash. Plus I am still trying to conquer knitting and am crocheting a shawl as my fingers type, not to mention the beading I have in another bag….

…and then there is the new phone I got last week that I need to learn more about.  My last phone I never did learn what all it would do and now this new one is 5 versions later…I have vowed to learn more about this phone than my last one. You’d think by now this phone could call me by name and tell me everything I need to know….and keep me on track and out of trouble…

I hope everyone has great plans for the holiday week-end; I am drinking iced tea, sitting on my patio (if not to hot or buggy) and stitching something.

Thank you for stopping by, I hope you have time to stitch today.

ttfn…sue

My major coup

 

While I was stitching the 1st Communion piece I also remembered that another granddaughter is graduating from high school this May and I probably should stitch something for her too. And maybe I should start thinking about it now.  But then I put that idea quickly on the back burner…

But a few weeks ago I was having lunch with friends and they wanted me to go by  a needlepoint shop in the area to see some finishing they were picking up. So off we went. While I was there, it was mentioned that I had stitched a 1st Communion piece and I showed the picture in my phone. I also mentioned I had a granddaughter graduating from a local high school. One of the owners mentioned that they paint the cypher for that school in two styles…Oh pleaseeeeee let me look. And yes here was what had been mulling around in my head… I asked if they could have this painted on 8 x 8 inch canvas and leave off the circle outline…sure thing. They took my order and then put the original canvas with it to send it to the painters. I thought this was strange; wouldn’t the artist have a master?

I was still at the shop visiting with friends and I learned that this shop also has an outreach program. The needlepoint shop supports “100 Jobs for 100 Moms” program and has hired women to hand-paint canvases four days a week. What a great idea…

So know I am going to get a canvas with major part of the designing already completed (I will not have to re-invent the wheel) and then I can personalize it for my Granddaughter. And you know what, I’m sure she will appreciate this even more knowing that we helped someone less fortunate in the process of making her special memory.

I love my local shops, they both carry a different variety of things, the help is good, stitchers are friendly and they both have outreach programs. Do visit your local shops often.

I’m thinking about beading the cypher; could use the three beads from Mr & Mrs. I think I might discuss this with the graduate, maybe she would like it finished with her tassel. Ummm—that would give me more time too. I’m liking this better all the time. I will keep you posted on the progress of my graduation gift.

Thank you for stopping by, I hope you have time to stitch today.

ttfn…sue

Burrrrrrrrr: Ann Strite-Kurz More catching up…

ED Note: I was out of my blogging phase when I stitched this and so pictures are incomplete…I am trying to be better now that I am back to blogging about taking pictures as I stitch. But sometimes I get carried away and forget…

After I finished Mr & Mrs I took a couple weeks off and just did knitting or Kumihimo…anything without beads. But one day I was looking through my stash and came across this piece. I have always loved it, it is an adaptation of a Charlie Harper print and I love Charlie Harper prints.

Ann-Strite Kurz (https://www.annstritekurz.com/ ) has always been one of my favorite teachers. If you read Ann’s resume it is very impressive…she is one of those teachers who has forgotten more than some of us will ever learn.

I own many of her books and I follow her article every month, Using Common Stitches in Uncommon Ways, in Needlepoint Now (https://www.needlepointnow.com/). Our guild had her teach an applique class one time and I loved it; I still use the techniques I learned in this class.

I love her work but was never able to get into one of her classes at ANG national seminars…My luck of the draw never seemed to work and most of her classes seemed to go to lottery.

Somewhere along my stitching path I had acquired one of Ann’s teaching pieces, Br-r-r-r-rdbath, (probably a stash sale or someone gave this to me). It has been one of my favorite pieces for a long time and had been waiting it’s turn in my stash, so I pulled it out…time to do an Ann piece.

Ann’s books are so well written that I knew her instructions would be no less and they were everything I expected them to be…excellent. Ann’s instructions and diagrams are some of the best. I had no idea what I had gotten myself into…I was looking for a fun easy stitch but this was going to be a learning piece. But you know what I have always loved this piece so it became my at home project.

First you basted guide lines on the canvas and then I started the design…

First you stitch the Smyrna outlines (dotted lines in picture)…then you started the border designs. The borders (A & B in picture) are truly a lesson in “Using Common Stitches in Uncommon Ways”! If I remember correctly, there were at least four steps to each border and then BEADING. Remember I said I was trying to avoid another beading project? Well at least you waited until the design was completed to add beading maybe I would recover from the Mr & Mrs beading.

 

Then I started the design part of the piece and every area was a review of a previously learned skill or an adaptation Ann has created to enhance this design (area C the birdbath.)  I loved stitching this piece…okay maybe love is a strong word but I liked the challenge it presented. The leaves (D in picture) became a challenge for me and then I decided, this was my piece and I was stitching it for me and so if the leaves were giving me a fit I needed to adapt and overcome. The leaves became my change to the piece; I had stitched the first two (D in picture) as instructed and was having a devil of a time, so the rest of the leaves are my adaptation of the instructions. This was my fun relaxing piece and I was keeping it that way. I’m the only one (and now you too) that notices that the leaves are a bit different …but then aren’t all leaves in nature different?!

 

The body of the bird was a relaxing stitch, nothing I didn’t know how to do. But the wings were my next challenge. I love the look of Blackwork but it is really a technique you have to study to be really good at it. Ann’s instructions were wonderful and easy to follow. I made a couple mistakes but Blackwork is a technique some spend a lifetime perfecting. If you would like to pursue this technique, there are several books written about this technique. Here are the ones I have in my library:

Ilse Altherr; Reversible Blackwork, Book 1 and Blackwork & Holbein, Book 2

Becky Hogg; Blackwork RSN Essential Sitch Guide.

Marion Scoular; Why Call It Blackwork?, Folio of Blackwork Patterns

Ann Strite-Kurz; The Heart of Blackwork

Leslie Wilkens; Blackwork Made Easy;

Jane Zimmerman; Blackwork Embriodery Patterns, The Art of English Blackwork

By the time this piece was completed and I was ready to start the beading, I had decided that I would add the sequins (you use a bead here to attach the sequins) but the border was going to be sans beading. I liked the look and I was not into that much beading again.

So here is another project under my belt and it is also in a ready-made frame. I really do like framing  pieces when I can do it myself, and then they don’t end up in my to finish later pile. So another project is completed but I still have more to catch up and then maybe by summer I will be back to finishing projects or sewing.

BTW, if you really love Charlie Harper designs, the Meredith Collection (http://themeredithcollection.com/) has them in needlepoint;  you can see them at The Meredith Collection: http://themeredithcollection.com/collection/charley-harper/needlepoint.

When I get caught up on some of my stash, I will add to my collection here.

 

Thank you for stopping by, I hope you have time to stitch today.

 

ttfn…sue