Finishing: ornaments

I’m going to break the ornaments up into types, so we will start with the round ornaments using illustration board.  There are 2 methods to finishing these ornaments: sewing and using glue. I will show you both, it is up to you to make your own decision to which to use. My ornaments are not going to the Smithsonian; my grandchildren hand them on real trees (pine oil) and there is the time it takes to do all by hand (hand sewing takes about twice as long).

RULE ONE: Have all materials at hand, there is nothing more frustrating than having to stop and go looking for something else

Before we begin there are a few hints to make finishing easier…

There are clips on the market for holding canvas and fabrics in place. They come in two and maybe three sizes (I just have two); they are usually found in quilt departments of fabric stores or quilt shops. I prefer the green ones to the mini ones and really I usually grab my old fashion clothes pins 1st.

Hooks: for Christmas ornaments: these are found at craft stores and come in gold and silver. I like the decorative ones for finishing needlepoint because I have never been happy with cording loops. My cording loops either are too long or too short, but with these, you can use a second one of the same hook or the more tradition ornament hook to hang them.  And should you decide to hang them on the wall, this hanger makes a nicer presentation.

Glue: If you decide glue is not a four letter word in finishing here is a helpful hint, especially when glue is less than half full. Lay the glue container on its side with cap on, make sure the tip is over a plastic lid to prevent accidents…Use a large lid and lay the entire bottle in it.

I use old credit cards or a scape of illustration board to spread glue, keeps my fingers clean.

I also keep a damp rag handy when using glue. It helps keep glue off your fingers and it can also help if glue gets on fabric or needlepoint accidentally.

Finishing: Round ornaments using illustration board (sewing method)

You will need:

Blocked ornament (all needlepoint needs to be blocked)

Backing material

Fleece:  I use one about a 1/4 inch thick.

Illustration Board: medium weight

Sewing thread to match backing and complement needlework.

Beeswax

Sharp needle

Hanger (can use cording) another post…

Usual sewing supplies: pins, scissors, clips etc.

I press the backing fabric to get the creases out…

Measure ornament and make illustration board cutouts; cut two same size: one for needlepoint, second for backing. I usually make these a tad smaller than the measurement; this is not an exact measurement, it is really by trial and error method because it actually depends on how much padding you use. Example: needlepoint measures 3 inches I make the illustration board about 2 7/8 inch around.

Make sure these 2 cut outs are the same, trim if necessary. I mark mine with an up arrow so I know how they are to be put together.

 

Cut quilt batting; I usually use two or three. Number 1 is cut about 1/4 inch smaller than illustration board; Number 2 is cut 1/4 inch smaller than first; and Number 3 is cut a 1/4 inch smaller than number 2. You can do this as many times as you want, but four is about the most I’ve seen.

Cut backing fabric 1/2 inch to 3/4 inch larger than the illustration board.

Cut needlepoint 1/2 inch to 3/4 inch larger than the illustration board. If using a lining for needlepoint cut this too.

I glue the quilt batting to the illustration board with a dot of glue to hold in place. Start with smallest cut batting and largest batting goes on top.

 

With wrong side of needlepoint up, place illustration board over needlework. Clip needlepoint.

With a double waxed thread begin to lace the needlepoint onto the illustration board. Start at 12:00 and work clockwise, pulling canvas taut but not tight enough to warp illustration board.

Repeat steps #6-7-8 with backing fabric

Attach purchased hanger if desired

 Place the two canvases together and pin. With back side (backing fabric) toward you ladder stitch together with a waxed heavy duty (quilt thread). A double waxed thread may be used too. Leave an opening to place the cording ends between the layers.

Make cording and attach with pins. Hide one end in the opening left in Step 11 and when finished placing cording hind second end.

With back side (backing fabric) toward you stitch cording to canvas with 1 strand of waxed thread. This thread should match the cording and if multi colored cord match fabric backing, whatever is most inconspicuous. Stitch through the cording, NOT over the cording. Stitching over the cording creates dimples in the cording that are not pretty.

Enjoy

 

 

The second way is to glue the ornament to the illustration board. There is not much difference except you are not lacing the needlepoint and backing nor sewing the ornament together.  It is much quicker, but does take some time to master  not gluing yourself too. Keep a damp rag handy and keep area clean.

Finishing: Round ornaments using illustration board (glue method) 

You will need:

Blocked ornament (all needlepoint needs to be blocked)

Backing material

Fleece:  I use one about a 1/4 inch thick.

Illustration Board: medium weight

Glue:  use archival save glue please

Clips to hold needlework and backing fabric

Sewing thread to match backing and complement needlework.

Beeswax

Sharp needle

Hanger (can use cording) another post…

Usual sewing supplies: pins, scissors, clips etc.

I press the backing fabric to get the creases out…

Measure ornament and make illustration board cutouts; cut two same size: one for needlepoint, second for backing. I usually make these a tad smaller than the measurement; this is not an exact measurement,  it is really by trial and error method because it actually depends on how much padding you use. Example: needlepoint measures 3 inches I make the illustration board about 2 7/8 inch around.

Make sure these 2 cut outs are the same, trim if necessary. I mark mine with an up arrow so I know how they are to be put together.

Cut quilt batting; I usually use two or three. Number 1 is cut about 1/4 inch smaller than illustration board; Number 2 is cut 1/4 inch smaller than first; and Number 3 is cut a 1/4 inch smaller than number 2. You can do this as many times as you want, but four is about the most I’ve seen.

Cut backing fabric 1/2 inch to 3/4 inch larger than the illustration board.

Cut needlepoint 1/2 inch to 3/4 inch larger than the illustration board. If using a lining for needlepoint cut this too.

I glue the quilt batting to the illustration board with a dot of glue to hold in place. Start with smallest cut batting and largest batting goes on top.

 

With wrong side of needlepoint up, place illustration board over needlework. Clip needlepoint with scissor.

Place a bead of glue on back side of illustration board around the edge. Start at 12:00 o’clock postion and use one of the clips to secure needlepoint to illustration board. Move to 6 o’clock postion and repeat. Do 3 o’clock and 9 o’clock the same and then fill in the rest until all clipped needlepoint canvas is attached to illustration board. Allow to set.

Repeat steps #6-7-8 with backing fabric

 

When set remove clips from needlepoint and backing illustration boards.

Attach purchased hanger if desired

On wrong/back sides of illustration board place a bead of glue around the edge (I usually keep glue about 1/2 inch from edge as I don’t want any seeping out) and in the center . Leave an opening to place the cording ends between the layers. Place two canvases together and secure with clips. Allow to dry completely.

Make cording and attach with pins. Hide one end in the opening left in Step 12 and when finished placing cording, hind second end.

With back side (backing fabric) toward you stitch cording to canvas with 1 strand of waxed thread. This thread should match the cording and if multi colored cord match fabric backing, whatever is most inconspicuous. Stitch through the cording, NOT over the cording. Stitching over the cording creates dimples in the cording that are not pretty.

Enjoy

Notice that I do not glue cording! I guess you could if you’re good but I personally like to sew my cording.

And that is how I make round ornaments using illustration board. Can you tell which one of the three was stitched? 😉

Thank you for stopping by, I hope you have time to stitch today!

ttfn…sue

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5 thoughts on “Finishing: ornaments

  1. I have looked everywhere for information on how to finish a round ornament with a gusset. Can you point me to any instructions?

    • I am not sure what you are talking about…a soft ornament would be like a box pillow and an ornament that has a hard backing would require a thicker piece of foam core. I would apply the gusset first and then the front and back.

    • I guess it would be a hard ornament with the thicker foam core as the gusset. I’m confused period on how to do the gusset. 🙂 Sorry to be so dense.

    • will try and find an ornament(s) to finish and show you. It will be down the road, I have to stitch something first.

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