Finishing: ornaments 3: Soft ornaments

Shaped ornaments may be finished with illustration board but I find it easier to finish them as a soft ornament. Any shape , even square or round may be finished using this method. These ornaments take a bit more time because they are hand stitched, no glue here.

Stuffing is a personal thing; some prefer tightly stuffed, while others like softer ornaments that are not stuffed as much. Whichever type you prefer, remember to use small amounts of fiber fill. Use a chopstick (reason to eat out) to push small amounts of fiber fill in to the nooks and crannies of shaped ornaments. My personal preference is somewhere between medium firm to firmly stuffed, squishy ornaments are not my thing.

Materials List:

BLOCKED Needlepoint

Copy of blocked needlepoint

Lining (optional)

Fabric Backing

Iron-on Pelon  or fleece: medium weight

Hanger (optional) Can use cording

Sewing thread to match Needlepoint and/or backing

Cording

Chop Stick or pointed tool

Usual sewing supplies

Step 1: Make a copy of your needlepoint on the copy machine and cut out.

 

 

Step 2: Lay copy right side up on the non-iron side of the pelon and draw around cut out copy.  Place on fabric backing for the ornament and iron to backing.

 

 

Step 3: Trim ornament to 1/2 inch and clip. Finger press the canvas to the back side of the needlepoint and hold in place with pins.

 

20160323 OrnSoft 4Step 4: With a long waxed thread tack the excess to the back of the needlework with running stitches. Be careful not to take the stitches to the front of needlepoint canvas.

Step 5: Repeat this process for the fabric backing, checking to be sure that 20160323 OrnSoft 5the fabric backing will match the needlepoint canvas. Be sure the running stitches are only tacked to the pelon or fleece.

Step 6: Optional. I used a hanger I bent to fit as a 20160323 OrnSoft 6hanger  to fit the sweaters.  I attached this to the needlepoint side of the canvas with basting stitches.

 

 

20160323 OrnSoft 7Step 7: Pin the needlepoint to the fabric backing.

Step 8: With the back side facing you (don’t ask me why…it’s just easier) and a waxed thread, ladder stitch the front to the back. The ladder stitch catches canvas 3-4 threads on the needlepoint and then 20160323 OrnSoft 8 ladder stitch graphicabout a 1/4 inch in the fold of the backing fabric. Pull this stitch snuggly, drawing the canvas and backing together. Do not for get to leave an opening for the ends of the cording and a place to stuff. Note the sweater ornaments had two openings; one at the hanger and one I left at the bottom to use for stuffing.

20160323 OrnSoft 11Step 9:  Using small amounts of stuffing, stuff the ornaments to the desired fullness. Use a chop stitck, small knitting needle or any pointed instrument to stuff; poking small amounts of stuffing into small places and corners. When stuffed to desired fullness, 20160323 OrnSoft 10close the hole with more ladder stitches.

Step 10: Make a cording to match or blend with the needlepoint. Attach to needlepoint hiding the ends in an opening left for this purpose.

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Step 11: With back side (backing fabric) toward you stitch cording to canvas with 1 strand of waxed thread. This thread should match the cording and if multi colored cord match fabric backing, whatever is most inconspicuous. Stitch through the cording, NOT over the cording. Stitching over the cording creates dimples in the cording that are not pretty.

Enjoy your finished ornament.

 

 

 

 

There is another type of soft ornament finishing and that uses fleece. These ornaments are not stuffed but rather stitched with fleece layers between the front and the back. I find this a great way to make a scissor fob…

It is finished very much the same way the above ornament is done:

Materials:

Blocked needlepoint Canvas

Backing material

Fleece

Thread

Cording

Step 1: Cut needlepoint canvas to 1/2 inch from needlework, angle corners.

Step 2: Finger press to back of needlepoint and pin.

Step 3: Cut fleece just a bit smaller then needlework and attach with running stitches being careful not to go through to the front of the needlepoint.

Step 4: Cut backing fabric 1/2 larger than needlework. Also cut 2 more pieces of fleece 1/8 to 1/4 inch smaller than needlepoint.

Step 5: Finger press and pin into place, mitering corners.

 

Step 6: Stitch needlepoint to fabric backing using ladder stitch method. Remember to leave opening for cording.

Step 7: Making cording and attach to needlework.

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Enjoy your new scissor fob. Hint you can also use to park needles.

This will be all the finishing for a couple weeks. Today as  I am having total knee replacement and will be rehabbing for a few weeks. But I look at it this way, I will have a good knee to keep me on my finishing quest.

AND I am going to have some great stitching time! 😉

Thank you for stopping by, I hope you have time to stitch today!

ttfn…sue

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Finishing: ornaments 2: square or rectangle

As you probably guessed by now I am a glue person. I can lace a piece of needlepoint, I have and I will again but sometimes I just have too many ornaments to finish at one time. See the carrots from a few years ago (https://sudukc.wordpress.com/2011/04/26/recipe-for-finishing-carrots/) that was a production. And truthfully I would much rather have my Grandchildren carry around their ornaments in their sticky little hands (although I would prefer they didn’t have sticky fingers…but you know what I mean). The look of delight and love in their eyes when they see their favorite ornament is worth far more than any museum could ever offer me for a piece of my needlepoint

Today is finishing square and rectangle ornaments…there are only two differences between round /oval ornaments and square/rectangle ornaments. You don’t have to clip curves, there are none but you do have to miter the corners. It’s a trade off and personally I think the  round/oval is easier but I also like the look of the square/rectangle. And I really make more square ornaments than round ones…geometrics usually are square.

Again RULE ONE is having all materials at hand. I can’t emphasis this enough and trust me you will get frustrated if you have to stop and go to the craft store to purchase something (been there, bought that T-shirt many times).

Let’s get started.

Finishing:  Square/rectangle ornaments using illustration board (glue method)

You will need:

Blocked ornament (all needlepoint needs to be blocked)

Backing material

Lining material if needed

Fleece:  I use one about a 1/4 inch thick.

Illustration Board: medium weight

Glue:  use archival save glue please

Clips to hold needlework and backing fabric

Sewing thread to match backing and complement needlework.

Beeswax

Sharp needle

Hanger (can use cording) another post…

Usual sewing supplies: pins, scissors, clips etc.

1.I press the backing fabric to get the creases out, if lining ornament (you only need to line an ornament if you did an open background stitch or your design has large open areas (not stitched).

2. Measure ornament and cut out illustration board cutouts; cut two same size: one for needlepoint, second for backing. I usually make these a tad smaller than the measurement; this is not an exact measurement, it is really by trial and error method because it actually depends on how much padding you use. Example:  needlepoint measures 3 inches x 3 inches, I make the illustration board about 2 7/8 inch by 2 7/8 inch.

Make sure these 2 cut outs are the same, trim if necessary. I mark mine with an up arrow so I know how they are to be put together.

3.Cut quilt batting; I usually use two for the back and three on the front. Number 1 is cut about 1/4 inch smaller than illustration board; number 2 is cut 1/4 inch smaller than first; and number 3 is cut a 1/4 inch smaller than number 2. You can do this as many times as you want, but four is about the most I’ve seen.

 

4.Cut backing fabric 1/2 inch to 3/4 inch larger than the illustration board.

 

5.Cut needlepoint 1/2 inch to 3/4 inch larger than the illustration board, trim corners diagonally. If using a lining for needlepoint cut this too. For ornaments on illustration board I use the same size lining fabric as needlepoint and you will aple the lining first and then repeat the same process for the needlework.

 

6.I glue the quilt batting to the illustration board with a dot of glue to hold in place. Start with smallest cut batting and largest batting goes on top.

At this point if your needlework need lining do lining first and then repeat with needlework. You do not need to finger press the lining fabric.

7.With wrong side of needlepoint (lining fabric) up, Finger press the corners and sides. Place illustration board over needlework.

8.Place a bead of glue on back side of illustration board at the corners. Start with the corners, turning them in to start mitered corner. I usually do one side and then the opposite side. It is important to keep design centered on the illustration board. Allow to set.

9.Run a small bead of glue along opposite edges of the illustration board and turn needlework bto the back , finish mitering the corners and secure in place with clips until set.

10.Repeat steps #6-7-8-9 with backing fabric

11.When set remove clips from needlepoint and backing illustration boards.

12.Attach purchased hanger if desired or can make from cording.

13.On wrong/back sides of illustration board place thin layer of  glue over the backs of the illustration board;. Keep glue about 1/4  inch from edge as I don’t want any seeping out. Leave an opening to place the cording ends between the layers. Place two canvases together and secure with clips. Allow to dry completely.

14. Make cording and attach with pins. Hide one end in the opening left in Step 12 and when finished placing cording, hind second end.

15. With back side (backing fabric) toward you stitch cording to canvas with 1 strand of waxed thread. This  thread should match the cording and if multi colored cord match fabric backing, whatever is most inconspicuous. Stitch through the cording, NOT over the cording. Stitching over the cording creates dimples in the cording that are not pretty.

Notice that I do not glue cording! I guess you could if you’re good but I personally like to sew my cording.

16. Enjoy

 

 

 

Lacing Method is the same except that you turn all to back and hold in place with clips or pins. Lacing should begin in the middle of a side and proceed to 1st miters. Stitch the miters as you go around.

Thank you for stopping by, I hope you have time to stitch today!

ttfn…sue

Finishing: ornaments

I’m going to break the ornaments up into types, so we will start with the round ornaments using illustration board.  There are 2 methods to finishing these ornaments: sewing and using glue. I will show you both, it is up to you to make your own decision to which to use. My ornaments are not going to the Smithsonian; my grandchildren hand them on real trees (pine oil) and there is the time it takes to do all by hand (hand sewing takes about twice as long).

RULE ONE: Have all materials at hand, there is nothing more frustrating than having to stop and go looking for something else

Before we begin there are a few hints to make finishing easier…

There are clips on the market for holding canvas and fabrics in place. They come in two and maybe three sizes (I just have two); they are usually found in quilt departments of fabric stores or quilt shops. I prefer the green ones to the mini ones and really I usually grab my old fashion clothes pins 1st.

Hooks: for Christmas ornaments: these are found at craft stores and come in gold and silver. I like the decorative ones for finishing needlepoint because I have never been happy with cording loops. My cording loops either are too long or too short, but with these, you can use a second one of the same hook or the more tradition ornament hook to hang them.  And should you decide to hang them on the wall, this hanger makes a nicer presentation.

Glue: If you decide glue is not a four letter word in finishing here is a helpful hint, especially when glue is less than half full. Lay the glue container on its side with cap on, make sure the tip is over a plastic lid to prevent accidents…Use a large lid and lay the entire bottle in it.

I use old credit cards or a scape of illustration board to spread glue, keeps my fingers clean.

I also keep a damp rag handy when using glue. It helps keep glue off your fingers and it can also help if glue gets on fabric or needlepoint accidentally.

Finishing: Round ornaments using illustration board (sewing method)

You will need:

Blocked ornament (all needlepoint needs to be blocked)

Backing material

Fleece:  I use one about a 1/4 inch thick.

Illustration Board: medium weight

Sewing thread to match backing and complement needlework.

Beeswax

Sharp needle

Hanger (can use cording) another post…

Usual sewing supplies: pins, scissors, clips etc.

I press the backing fabric to get the creases out…

Measure ornament and make illustration board cutouts; cut two same size: one for needlepoint, second for backing. I usually make these a tad smaller than the measurement; this is not an exact measurement, it is really by trial and error method because it actually depends on how much padding you use. Example: needlepoint measures 3 inches I make the illustration board about 2 7/8 inch around.

Make sure these 2 cut outs are the same, trim if necessary. I mark mine with an up arrow so I know how they are to be put together.

 

Cut quilt batting; I usually use two or three. Number 1 is cut about 1/4 inch smaller than illustration board; Number 2 is cut 1/4 inch smaller than first; and Number 3 is cut a 1/4 inch smaller than number 2. You can do this as many times as you want, but four is about the most I’ve seen.

Cut backing fabric 1/2 inch to 3/4 inch larger than the illustration board.

Cut needlepoint 1/2 inch to 3/4 inch larger than the illustration board. If using a lining for needlepoint cut this too.

I glue the quilt batting to the illustration board with a dot of glue to hold in place. Start with smallest cut batting and largest batting goes on top.

 

With wrong side of needlepoint up, place illustration board over needlework. Clip needlepoint.

With a double waxed thread begin to lace the needlepoint onto the illustration board. Start at 12:00 and work clockwise, pulling canvas taut but not tight enough to warp illustration board.

Repeat steps #6-7-8 with backing fabric

Attach purchased hanger if desired

 Place the two canvases together and pin. With back side (backing fabric) toward you ladder stitch together with a waxed heavy duty (quilt thread). A double waxed thread may be used too. Leave an opening to place the cording ends between the layers.

Make cording and attach with pins. Hide one end in the opening left in Step 11 and when finished placing cording hind second end.

With back side (backing fabric) toward you stitch cording to canvas with 1 strand of waxed thread. This thread should match the cording and if multi colored cord match fabric backing, whatever is most inconspicuous. Stitch through the cording, NOT over the cording. Stitching over the cording creates dimples in the cording that are not pretty.

Enjoy

 

 

The second way is to glue the ornament to the illustration board. There is not much difference except you are not lacing the needlepoint and backing nor sewing the ornament together.  It is much quicker, but does take some time to master  not gluing yourself too. Keep a damp rag handy and keep area clean.

Finishing: Round ornaments using illustration board (glue method) 

You will need:

Blocked ornament (all needlepoint needs to be blocked)

Backing material

Fleece:  I use one about a 1/4 inch thick.

Illustration Board: medium weight

Glue:  use archival save glue please

Clips to hold needlework and backing fabric

Sewing thread to match backing and complement needlework.

Beeswax

Sharp needle

Hanger (can use cording) another post…

Usual sewing supplies: pins, scissors, clips etc.

I press the backing fabric to get the creases out…

Measure ornament and make illustration board cutouts; cut two same size: one for needlepoint, second for backing. I usually make these a tad smaller than the measurement; this is not an exact measurement,  it is really by trial and error method because it actually depends on how much padding you use. Example: needlepoint measures 3 inches I make the illustration board about 2 7/8 inch around.

Make sure these 2 cut outs are the same, trim if necessary. I mark mine with an up arrow so I know how they are to be put together.

Cut quilt batting; I usually use two or three. Number 1 is cut about 1/4 inch smaller than illustration board; Number 2 is cut 1/4 inch smaller than first; and Number 3 is cut a 1/4 inch smaller than number 2. You can do this as many times as you want, but four is about the most I’ve seen.

Cut backing fabric 1/2 inch to 3/4 inch larger than the illustration board.

Cut needlepoint 1/2 inch to 3/4 inch larger than the illustration board. If using a lining for needlepoint cut this too.

I glue the quilt batting to the illustration board with a dot of glue to hold in place. Start with smallest cut batting and largest batting goes on top.

 

With wrong side of needlepoint up, place illustration board over needlework. Clip needlepoint with scissor.

Place a bead of glue on back side of illustration board around the edge. Start at 12:00 o’clock postion and use one of the clips to secure needlepoint to illustration board. Move to 6 o’clock postion and repeat. Do 3 o’clock and 9 o’clock the same and then fill in the rest until all clipped needlepoint canvas is attached to illustration board. Allow to set.

Repeat steps #6-7-8 with backing fabric

 

When set remove clips from needlepoint and backing illustration boards.

Attach purchased hanger if desired

On wrong/back sides of illustration board place a bead of glue around the edge (I usually keep glue about 1/2 inch from edge as I don’t want any seeping out) and in the center . Leave an opening to place the cording ends between the layers. Place two canvases together and secure with clips. Allow to dry completely.

Make cording and attach with pins. Hide one end in the opening left in Step 12 and when finished placing cording, hind second end.

With back side (backing fabric) toward you stitch cording to canvas with 1 strand of waxed thread. This thread should match the cording and if multi colored cord match fabric backing, whatever is most inconspicuous. Stitch through the cording, NOT over the cording. Stitching over the cording creates dimples in the cording that are not pretty.

Enjoy

Notice that I do not glue cording! I guess you could if you’re good but I personally like to sew my cording.

And that is how I make round ornaments using illustration board. Can you tell which one of the three was stitched? 😉

Thank you for stopping by, I hope you have time to stitch today!

ttfn…sue

All Rolled up…the Roll-ups are finished…Thank goodness

Finishing: Roll-ups

(each type of finishing has its own specific ins and outs. )

Bottom of roll-up will only have a beginning and ending open area, no hanger.

14-09-06 cord apply 01 begin bury end1. Pin the cording to needlework burying the beginning and ending knots.

On roll-ups, if I have a loop end I start with this end, otherwise I bury the knot. Sometimes if long cord 14-09-06 cord apply 02  pinhas been made you will only have the loop for one of your finishes. Just bury the knotted in a twist or two deeper and loop through the twist; this takes some practice but it can be just as effective.

14-09-06 cord apply 03 other half2. Pin around top. I pin cording from left to right but sew right to left (see #4 below)

3. If making the hanger; run cording through the loop or cording twist. (see #1 above).

Leave a hanger length on the top. Then go through the cording again and bury the knot.

NOTE — Top hanger: if hanger has been inserted in top (see blog: https://sudukc.wordpress.com/2014/08/26/hanger-in-the-top-piece/) just go through loop, knot twice( if extra cording is available), cut and bury the knot.

4. Using a waxed thread (sewing thread or a length of floss to match cording.) I sew with right side of needlework facing me; and I sew from right to left. I try to start right at the end where the two cords are buried and I catch the left end only and just tack it. When I come back around I secure the cording beginning and ending well (this is also where top loop hanger comes in.) This allows me some “fudge” room in case the cording is too loose or pulled to tight.

Remember to sew the opening(s) closed where the cording knots were inserted at the beginning and end. At these openings, I do not try to do a ladder stitch, but rather just slip stitch well. Ornaments do not take a lot of wear and tear so the cording just h14-09-06 cord apply 04 stitch through cordingas to be attached securely. I sometimes slip my needle back and re-stitch areas where the canvas has been left open and where the cording passes through itself and the knots are hidden.

14-09-06 cord apply 05 stitch through cordingGo through the cording, NOT over the cording. Going over the cording will make dimples in the cording (not pretty).

5. Tie off thread by running back and forth several times in the needlework. Cut close to finished needlework.

Enjoy

14-09-06 lewis roll upsAnd this brings an end to finishing the roll ups. I have six roll-ups waiting to be given as a gift and two for me.  The six are from a local needlework artist, Joan Lewis. She is no longer painting but I think she has some of her designs still left, if you are 14-09-06 betsy & TJinterested I will ask her. Thomas Jefferson and Betsy Ross are Ann Stradal ABS Designs and are available on her website (http://www.absdesignsonline.com/)  I’ve stitched  Thomas Jefferson twice but this is the first one I finished. I am a TJ fan from way back, I think Monticello is the prettiest Presidential House of them all and if I had owned it I would have had a hard time letting go of it.  I always 14-09-06 TJ tricornsaw him was a triangular shape, even though it is backwards of the true Tricornes  (https://sudukc.wordpress.com/2014/08/25/i-am-all-stuffed-out/) And Betsy I did put a hanger on but for no14-09-06 Betsy hangerw it a ribbon down her back and I just love her basket and the bullions on her hat and shawl…not that I loved doing the bullions…I just like the way they look.

 

General thoughts on finishing:

I will tell you this from experience, the more you finish the easier it gets and when you do several pieces of the same type (i.e. Roll-ups, ornaments, pillows, etc.) you get into an assembly line rhythm.

You may not like finishing; finishing is not for everyone but I think you should try one time just so you appreciate the work that goes into this art.  The finishers I know are really good at what they do and are fast considering that they do many pieces every week and then think of the season rush…Christmas, Halloween and Easter. It is pretty mind blowing to me; I would never make it as a finisher. If I make a boo-boo on my own needlework, it is one thing BUT if I made a boo-boo on someone else’s needlework I would be devastated. And I think you have a tendency to be much more particular when you are paying someone to finish than you are when you do it yourself. Finishing is a completion of your needlework. Whether you consciously think about it or not, you have a finished product in mind while you are stitching the needlework. And after you are done stitching you take or send your needlework to a shop to have it finished. Scary. Most shops do not let you talk to the finisher, so you better be able to convey your thoughts to the needlepoint shop person. Do you want simple or elaborate. Remember, unless you convey to the shop (who conveys this to the finisher) what you want…you may not get back what your mind sees as the finished product.

Patty Morrison was a local finisher and God called her home much too quickly for her family and friends. Patty always had a smile on her face and was one of those uplifting people you wanted to spend time with every day. I asked her one time how she did so many types of finishing. She told me she tried when possible to lump several together, ornaments, pillows, stockings etc. (the assembly line production) while keeping them in close date order to the way they arrived. She looked at every piece of needlework as if she had stitched it and was giving it to a special friend. She loved it when a needle worker would say on finishing instructions, “Do your magic, I would like a blue fabric” Or “do your magic.” She also said she thought of finishing as having her art shine through other people’s needlework; she was helping people complete their idea.

I have lots more to finish but it will be a few weeks before I have any more finishing but I promise to post when I do. I also have a desk full of work, many new ideas floating around in my head for the blog and needlework designs and of course enough stitching to keep me busy for a long time.

Thank you for stopping by, I hope you find time to stitch today! ttfn…sue

Christmas notes and ornament too

Hope everyone had a Merry Christmas and that you were so good Santa left gifts in abundance. I was a good girl, received my usual Christmas books, but it would not be Christmas without books. Added a couple Jiminy Crickets, and of course a needlepoint…more about these later.

Every year our family does an ornament exchange; only rule is the ornament has to be homemade. This year I decided to do needle felting. I had seen instructions for a snowman on another website (http://craftsncoffee.com/2013/12/05/how-to-make-adorable-needle-felted-snowman-ornaments/) and thought he was cute. I have all the needle felting needles and stuff so I decided this was for me.

After downloading and reading the instructions I began to gather stuff together…and wouldn’t you know it that’s when I found out I didn’t have a styrofoam ball. Not to be deterred by a small basic necessity I decided to make a ball (temari OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAball making has come in handy). So I started with a basic ball made by wrapping yarn to desired size and adding a layer of cotton crochet thread over the top…presto magic a ball. Nice part about this was I didn’t have to make sure it was as round as possible; it wasn’t going to be a temari ball. As I was rolling this ball I decided that this might be a better choice

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for me since I was not sure what I was doing  and I probably would make a mess of a styrofoam ball…There was also the fact that I had waited until the day before I needed the ornament to begin.

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I tried the roving for a background but soon realized that this was not going well and was going to take forever. Another ah-ha moment…cut a piece of felt to fit ball and try adhering it to the base. What was the worst that could happen? (I had a needlepoint

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ornament in the wings, if needed) So I cut a piece of felt, trimmed the ends, roughed up the felt and began to adhere the felt to the ball. I think dumb luck sometimes guides me…I decided to begin in the middle and work toward the ends…that way I could cut and adjust the felt as I went. I needle punched

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAaround the center portion, ruffed up the felt at the cut lines and then did the same to the ends. As you can see from the pictures there was no pattern just a rough cut …next time will be more precise.

13-12-27 I patternsAfter I got the background on the ball I cut a white oval from felt, roughed up the backside and adhered it to the base. At this point I decided hit and miss was not going to do it…I needed a plan so off to my trusty computer to make some patterns. Made a pattern divided it up, printed it off and cut it up and OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAmade adjustments to computer pattern…had been to large first try. Second try was better and so I used these patterns to finish the parts of the snowman. First I used roving to make the cheeks, then I rolled roving to make a cone nose and the rest was cut felt (all were roughed up on their backsides to adhere better. After all the felt was in place, I used #8 perle OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAcotton to make Colonial Knot eyes and French Knot mouth with a chenille needle.

Then I decided ornament needed something on the back side…back to the computer and one holly pattern later was ready to finish the ornament. I OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAtried to write my initials and the date on red felt berries but pen and felt don’t mix well so I used red roving to cover my mistakes. .One hanger later and my ornament was completed.

There are several things I would have done differently and I plan to make more, keep better OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAnotes and write the instructions clearly.

But for now I am off to read, sip tea, stitch NEEDLEPOINT and watch the New Year arrive in a few days.

Thank you for stopping by, I hope you have time to stitch today and everyday the rest of this year! ttfn…sue

Hope Everyone had a great holiday…

Hope everyone had a wonderful Christmas, Chanukah, or whatever holiday you choose to celebrate.
Our family was all together (minus one, but he was in our hearts and we talked to him.) My second son did his magic in the kitchen and we all gorged ourselves Christmas Eve. We do not exchange Christmas gifts but rather make ornaments

but a few of our ornaments...reindeer were big this year.

but a few of our ornaments…reindeer were big this year.

and have game of who gets the ornament. My ornament (see last post was a success and stolen twice (the limit); there were great ornaments this year, think we’ll do the same next year.
Grandma & Grandpa get to give presents…we are allowed to spoil the Grandchildren…and anyway an ornament isn’t much fun when your little.
12-26-12 tri santa

This is the needlepoint Santa for this year. It is a Deborah Forney Class (http://www.deborahforney.com/Resume.htm), Ho Ho Ho Santa. Great class I recommend it to anyone and Deborah is a great teacher.

This year’s Poinsettia. 2012 poinsettia

Thought I posted about this but could not find so I will briefly fill you in. Every year, I purchase a poinsettia from a friend whose PEO group sells them as their fundraiser. AND every year I manage to kill it. Last year the poinsettia somehow managed to survive until spring and by early summer my oldest son had taken over garden management and kept the plant alive and thriving. This fall we brought it in and did the dark light thing you are supposed to do to make them turn red again. Someone told us it takes two years to turn it red and so we just left it in the house and thought we’d try again next year. BUT Christmas morning we had our own miracle…
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Thank you for stopping by and I hope you have time to stitch today and the rest of the holidays!
ttfn…sue

Beaded edging

or how I really spent Thanksgiving week-end. Did minimal shopping but had a relaxing time just beading.

11-29-12 bead aA friend gave me this beading mat last summer and I have not had a chance to try it until now. I don’t know where you can get it but I bet a local needlework or bead store could help you but here are a couple references I found:

http://www.amazon.com/Beadsmith-BMS1-Sticky-Bead-Mat/dp/B003SRGE5M

http://www.widgetsupply.com/product/BDH10.html?gclid=CNOv7eiZ8rMCFQVgMgod7G0Arg

Even found this Double sized mat, but I thought the smaller one was just right for needlepoint:

http://www.etsy.com/listing/95260015/sticky-bead-mat-xl-double-sided?utm_source=googleproduct&utm_medium=syndication&utm_campaign=GPS&gclid=CMjE5YmZ8rMCFc5cMgod7i8AIQ

shows how few beads fell off ...but I did not shake it just turned on side.

shows how few beads fell off …but I did not shake it just turned on side.

I love this thing, kept the beads in place and allowed me to have the beads close as I stitched around the piece. I had seen this finishing technique at an EGA meeting last spring and filled a mental picture away for later use.

After stitching the needlepoint I finished two separate pieces over archival safe illustration board (or whatever you use. It has to have some weight

5 beads was the width of my ornament ...yours ma be different

5 beads was the width of my ornament …yours ma be different

to it to support the beads and needlepoint, but I thought foam core would be too bulky) I used a piece of extra fluffy batting to give some padding to both sides.  I also did not glue the pieces on but laced them to each illustration board, then I stitched the two sided together. My beading was 5 beads to cover (depending on the size of you bead and your backing board yours may be different.) Each time I put another row of beads on I went through a

be sure to bring needle out in correct spot or your beading will be uneven.

be sure to bring needle out in correct spot or your beading will be uneven.

previous row of beads and when I began or ended a thread I went through several rows of beads and the buried the thread in the center. When I completed the beading around I made a beaded loop for the hanger.

That’s how I spent last week-end and now my niece has an ornament for her philanthropic group Christmas ornament exchange.

Thank you for stopping by and I hope you have time to stitch today!
ttfn…sue

11-29-12 bead f11-29-12 bead h11-29-12 bead g

11-29-12 bead j