Harikuyo – Broken Needle Festival.

Harikuyo – Broken Needle Festival.

Yesterday was “Harikuyo – Broken Needle Festival.” I have actively celebrated this for the past two years, you can click on hari-kuyo in the Categories list to see my other posts. Many fellow bloggers celebrate this festival too, so just check your other blogs or Google the festival. . If you would like to see how the ladies in the orient honor their prized possession here are a few links:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hari-Kuyo

Yesterday I spent a few hours preparing my wonderful previously stitched with needles for my “Harikuyo – Broken Needle Festival.” Last year I wrapped my needles in the same way I did this year; I have not yet decided how to permanently honor these old friends. I don’t want to put them in the ground; it is too cold and I don’t want them to eventually work up to the surface and hurt someone. One of my DiLs suggested I re-purpose them and do something creative with them to give them a new permanent life. Good idea just has not figured out what that will be.

I have thought about mingling them with the orts of the threads they so loyally helped onto my canvases to create the needlework I enjoy. I have kept orts and placed them in clear balls to decorate a stitching tree. And while this is an excellent idea it is so seasonal that I am waiting for inspiration to hit me for a more year-round idea. Any suggestions?

I kept last year’s packet on my desk to remind me that my needles are a very important part of my work and that I need to treat them with respect. I try to remember that like stitchers, needles come is different types and each has a purpose.

The Chenille friends are very much like my Tapestry friends but they have a sharp point…their numbers are even the same. I love the fact that the larger the needle size in Tapestry and Chenille needles, the smaller the needle…it’s good to know that larger can be smaller.  Chenille needles make it easier to pierce the needlepoint canvas when necessary and also they pass through layers with easy. I’m sure when I use my Chenille needles for this purpose my Tapestry needles are very relieved; because if I forget I usually end up pushing or pulling the Tapestry needle with needle-nosed pliers and sometimes I injure the eye of the needle and, sad to say, it will often join other fallen needles in the loved, used and put away area.

I seem to be most hard on the eyes of my needles. I think I sometimes try and make small needle do the job of one of its larger sisters. I will put a thread through the eye and then have to push and tug the needle…and I know this is not good on the needle or the thread.

Happily, I noticed I have very few broken Tapestry and Chenille but my beading needles are another story; I am really tough on these poor girls. I love the look of beading; I think I just do not enjoy the process. I have been known not only to break these fragile girls but to destroy a bead or two in the process. And their eyes are so fine and thin…not to mention the rest of them…I think it must be a bit of needle envy on my part…never was I this fine and thin.

And sad to say, this year my regular sewing needles and sewing machine needles are in short supply in the loved , used and put away area. This is not because I treat them better it is because I have not been using them. I’m hoping that this year will put a different perspective on these workhorse ladies of needlework and stitching. I keep many different types and sizes of needles in my sewing area; I have sewing machine needles from heavy duty to sheer and light; the Embroidery, sharps and millenary ladies all have their jobs and the needles are sized to do them.  I love my curved needle for those hard to stitch areas; they seem to breeze through like a lady waltzing with her favorite guy. All of these lovely needles are in my finishing sewing boxes (yes I have two) in my needlework finishing area.

So for now until I have that ah-ha moment; I have wrapped and will keep  my wrapped needles of honor on my desk to remind me this year to better about using the correct needle for the job and not to abuse and hurt them but to retire them with love and memories of jobs well done.

Thank you for stopping by and today you must find time to stitch.

 

ttfn…sue

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One thought on “Harikuyo – Broken Needle Festival.

  1. A styrofoam ball would be an excellent place for safekeeping bent and broken needles throughout the year. Just push them in far enough that they won’t work their way out again. At the end of the year you can make it into a Temari Ball.

    I am suggesting something that I have never seen before or tried myself so please do let us know if you like the idea, adopt the idea and if it works!
    PB

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